CLASSICAL OPUS no.84

Gioachino Rossini: “La gazza ladra”

ジョアキーノ・ロッシーニ – 「カサ泥棒」

 

TIME COMMITMENT: 9 minutes

The plumpish bard of lower classes painted in stark, fauvist hues of opera buffa.  The indefatigable creator of ludic songs preferred tunes that were anthemic, but also zestful and danceable, playfully evoking bygone minuets.  I added here a second version, despite the tinny recording quality.  After all, it’s conducted by maestro Toscanini.

 

MUSIC

 

INFO

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_gazza_ladra

 

A REFLECTION

Each of us bears the imprint

Of a friend met along the way;

In each the trace of each.

For good or evil

In wisdom or in folly

 

Primo Levi: “To My Friends”

 

Published in: on October 7, 2018 at 1:41 pm  Leave a Comment  

CLASSICAL OPUS no.96

Gustav Mahler – “Adagietto from 5th symphony, part III, 4th mvmt”

グスタフ・マーラー – 「第5交響曲のアダジエート、パートIII、第4楽章」

 

TIME COMMITMENT: 11 minutes

Buoyant but rueful, hummable and redemptive, this fragment is scored for strings and harp only. Mahler’s palette shines with web-like contours and his aficionados bicker over who best gives it justice: von Karajan, Klemperer or Bernstein.  But his 5th Symphony is also irredeemably cross-textual, equipped with a Wagnerian quote, impregnated with Thomas Mann’s inspiration and immortalized by Luchino Visconti’s ultimate fresco.

 

MUSIC

 

INFO

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6926092

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._5_(Mahler)

 

A REFLECTION

When a sighing begins

In the violins

Of the autumn-song,

My heart is drowned

In the slow sound

Languorous and long

 

Paul Verlaine: “Autumn song”

Published in: on September 25, 2018 at 6:16 pm  Leave a Comment  

CLASSICAL OPUS no.97

Johannes Brahms – “Symphony 4 in E Minor”

ヨハネス・ブラームス – 「交響曲4 in Eマイナー」

 

TIME COMMITMENT: 45 minutes

The unmistakable allegretto opening inebriates us with its festive, reckless triumphalism.  The swirling orchestral architecture then carries us forward, but it’s the 4th movement – with its obsessive bass figures of a baroque-like passacaglia – that makes the last 12 minutes memorable.  Overshadowed by Mahler’s formal breakthroughs, Brahms was often accused of conservatism (or mis-timed revivalism?) yet remained influential among later modernists.  Leonard Bernstein’s commentary in the second video is an absolute delight.

 

MUSIC

 

INFO

 

 

A REFLECTION

Flying past the wind and wave

Fleeing time, who will stop it?

You enjoy it in the moment

And off, running, in haste, now

 

Johann Gottfried von Herder: “Song of Life”

Published in: on September 24, 2018 at 7:03 pm  Leave a Comment